Delores Knipp

Seeker Science Video Features HAO's Delores Knipp

Photograph of Coronal Mass Ejections

Seeker, an American digital media network and content publisher, interviewed HAO's space scientist, Delores Knipp, in July 2019. The presentation is titled "How Earth's Magnetic Field Twists and Buckles During Solar Storms." Dr.

Space storms that go off-scale

Image of Hydrogen-α solar spectroheliogram

Terrestrial and space weather storm scales have a common shortcoming: The scales end at “5.” Nature of course doesn’t know this and sometimes produces a disturbance that is simply off the charts.

Delores Knipp

Delores Knipp is a Senior Research Associate at the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Energetic Particle Data for New Research

Delta II rocket launching the fifth GPS IIR(M) satellite

As part of the US National Space Weather Strategy and Action Plan, and following the 2016 Executive Order 13744, the Department of Defense (DoD) is now opening a more than 15-year record of GPS particle data to scientific scrutiny.

Keeping an Eye on Space Weather

Delores Knipp and Geomagnetic Storms

In The Conversation newsletter, scientists Delores Knipp and Brett Carter explore the significance of severe geomagnetic storm events and their impact on communications technology through descriptive historical accounts.

High-latitude ionospheric conductivity variability in three dimensions

Monday, August 8, 2016

We perform the first ever global-scale, altitude-dependent analysis of polar ionospheric conductivity variability using spectrally-resolved in-situ satellite particle measurements.  Our results show that height-integrated conductance and height-dependent conductivities are distinctly different.

May 1967 Great Storm and Radio Disruption Event

The flare image in Hydrogen-alpha emission (Image courtesy of NSO).
Friday, August 5, 2016

Although listed as one of the most significant events of the last 80 years, the space weather storm of late May 1967 has been of mostly fading academic interest.

GICs: The Bane of Technology-Dependent Societies

Image Credit: K.L. Turnbull, J.A. Wild (Lancaster University) and the SOHO/EIT consortium, Shutterstock
Tuesday, December 1, 2015

In a recent AGU editor's Vox Discussion, Delores Knipp explores the societal impacts of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). GICs can cause voltage swings, transformer heating, and reactive power loss in high-voltage power transmission systems.

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