Ionosphere

Preliminary Evidence of Madden-Julian Oscillation Effects on Ultra-Fast Tropical Waves in the Thermosphere

Graphic image of altitude (50-260 km) versus MJO phase depiction
Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Over the past two decades mounting evidence demonstrated that terrestrial weather significantly influences the dynamics and mean state of the thermosphere.

Haonan Wu

Haonan Wu is a visiting scientist in the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Haonan graduated from the University of Science and Technology of China and obtained his BS degree in Space Physics in 2017. He joined Clemson University in Fall 2017.

Junjie Chen

Junjie Chen is a scientific visitor in the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. His research interests include electrodynamics in the upper atmospheric.

Chih-Ting Hsu

Chih-Ting Hsu is a postdoctoral fellow in the High Altitude Observatory at NCAR. She’s mainly working on coupled upper atmosphere data assimilation.

Xueling Shi

Dr. Xueling Shi is a scientific visitor in the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Xueling received her PhD in Electrical Engineering from Virginia Tech and is now a postdoctoral associate there.

Bo Xiong

Bo Xiong is a scientific visitor at the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He is working on the investigation of ionospheric physics.

Xuguang Cai

Xugang Cai is a postdoctoral fellow II in the High Altitude Observatory at NCAR. He is working on the investigation of the thermosphere and ionosphere by GOLD satellite and numerical models (TIEGCM).

SAPS in the 2013 March 17 Storm Event: Initial Results from 1 the Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model

Figure of LTR simulation results of the ionospheric states
Thursday, October 31, 2019

Subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) are latitudinally narrow flow channels of large westward plasma drifts in the subauroral ionosphere.

THE PERSISTENT IONOSPHERIC RESPONSES OVER JAPAN AFTER THE IMPACT OF THE 2011 TOHOKU EARTHQUAKE

Graphic of two-dimensional filtered Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) total electron content (TEC) maps
Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Earthquake and tsunami are known to be the source of atmospheric gravity waves that can generate plasma ripples in the space. On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake occurred near the east coast of Honshu, Japan, unleashing a savage tsunami to strike offshore of Japan.

Dong Lin

Dr. Dong Lin is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research specializing in magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and space plasma instabilities.

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