Solar Physics

Preparing for the 2017 total Eclipse

On 21 August 2017 a total solar eclipse will pass across the continental United States, from Oregon on the west coast to South Carolina on the east. The eclipse will be a phenomenal experience for the millions of people who see it, but it also offers a unique opportunity to conduct scientific research of the solar atmosphere.

Philip Judge collaborates with Fudan University, China

Photograph of Fudan University, China

HAO Senior Scientist Philip Judge spent three weeks at China's Fudan University in October 2015. As an official Visiting Researcher, Philip worked with his host Roger Hutton, and recent graduate Wenxian Li, on magnetically sensitive emission lines formed in the solar corona.

Collaborating with Fudan University

HAO Senior Scientist Philip Judge spent three weeks at China's Fudan University in October 2015. As an official Visiting Researcher, Philip worked with his host Roger Hutton, and recent graduate Wenxian Li, on magnetically sensitive emission lines formed in the solar corona.

R. Grant Athay's Legacy Lives On

Grant Athay

The staff and alumni of the High Altitude Observatory were deeply saddened to hear of R. Grant Athay’s passing on June 10, 2015, in Provo, Utah.

Analyses of solar coronal prominence cavities

Composite image
Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Analyses of solar coronal prominence cavities by an international group of scientists including HAO's Sarah Gibson, Christian Bethge, Giuliana de Toma, Yuhong Fan, HAO visitor Urszula Bak Steslicka and University of Colorado graduate student Don Schmit, has been profiled in a

Long-Term Solar Variability

Overview and Research Goal

Solar Transients and Space Weather

Overview and Research Goal

HAO annouces the winner of the 2014 Newkirk Fellowship

Image of Ricky Egeland

The only recipient this year and the first winner from MSU, Ricky Egeland learned about the fellowship just moments after passing the oral examination for his doctorate in physics.

Into Africa, A Scientist’s Journey

“Chui”was the word on the radio; Swahili for leopard. The Masai are still the best wildlife spotters on the Mara, but they are not averse to using modern technology when it suits them.

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