Space Physics

Editor in Chief of Open Astronomy, a flagship for open publishing

In late February 2017, Senior Scientist Philip Judge was contacted by Ewa Chmielewska, Managing Editor at De Gruyter Open, a scientific publisher of its own and third-party journals. To his great surprise, Ewa invited Philip to become Editor-In-Chief of the online journal Open Astronomy.

Katelynn Greer Embraces Space Science & the Outdoors

Katelynn Greer at 2015 AGU meeting

Katelynn Greer is currently working as an Assistant Research Physicist at the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California- Berkeley, working with Tom Immel and Scott England.

Bolaji Segun, living his research dream

Bolaji Segun is a visiting researcher to HAO working with Qian Wu using the TIEGCM community model to study equatorial ionosphere variations caused by geomagnetic activities and stratospheric warming.

May 1967 Great Storm and Radio Disruption Event

The flare image in Hydrogen-alpha emission (Image courtesy of NSO).
Friday, August 5, 2016

Although listed as one of the most significant events of the last 80 years, the space weather storm of late May 1967 has been of mostly fading academic interest.

Stellar Evidence that the Sun May be in Transition

chromospheric activity and rotation in field dwarfs and subgiants
Friday, July 1, 2016

The study of Sun-like stars helps us to put the Sun in context. HAO Newkirk Fellow Ricky Egeland has co-authored a new publication with Space Science Institute scientist Travis Metcalfe and Carnegie Fellow Jennifer van Saders.

Tim Brown receives the James Craig Watson Metal

Tim Brown with STARE telescope

Former HAO Senior Scientist Tim Brown has received a prestigious award from the National Academy of Sciences for landmark research that he conducted while at NCAR in the 1990s and early 2000s.

Comet ISON's missing light

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

The AAS Nova site is featured a recent publication in the AAS journal by Paul Bryans of HAO. In the past sungrazing comets have produced extreme ultraviolet emissions as they passed through the sun's corona.

Mark Miesch

Dr. Mark Miesch is a staff scientist in the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. His research explores the origins of solar magnetic activity using supercomputer models, including the processes that give rise to the 11-year solar cycle

SOLAR COUSIN PRESENTS A MYSTERY FOR THE DYNAMO

HD30495 Figure 1
Thursday, December 3, 2015

What might happen to the well-known 11-year solar cycle if the Sun were spun up to rotate more than two times faster? To investigate such questions of the dependence of the Sun's internal dynamo on parameters such as rotation we must look to other stars with different physical conditions.

The Sun: A Pictorial Introduction

The slides in this collection were written By P. Charbonneau and O.R. White–April 18, 1995.

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